Tag Archives | Science Fiction

Eye of Man, Blood of Cylon

Kara Thrace a.k.a. Starbuck More Galactica news! Those folks at Scifi.com are tricksy; check out this hidden Easter egg (or Life Day egg, or whatever the Colonial equivalent is):

Go to this page, click on “Watch a full episode & more,” then scroll down and click on “First Look” to see the first thirteen minutes of the season premiere.

Colonel Tigh seems to be channeling G’kar from Babylon 5 … while Leoben seems to be channeling Kenny from South Park. Also, the scene between Tigh and Cavill echoes the scene between Jammer and Doral in the webisodes.

Conical hat tip to Ain’t It Cool News.


Cylon Kool-aid

Battlestar Galactica In preparation for season 3 of Battlestar Galactica, which starts this Friday, you might want to check out these webisodes, a series of short clips (a couple of minutes each – with one more scheduled for Thursday, I believe) filling us in on what’s been going on between seasons 2 and 3, as the human colonists adjust, or fail to adjust, to the Cylon occupation of New Caprica.

The best bit yet: Doral’s interrogation of Jammer.


Listen to America

Captain America, that is. From the latest issue (Captain America #22, Nov. 2006), here’s a conversation on the Superhuman Registration Act between Captain America (Steve Rogers) and S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent 13 (Sharon Carter):

AGENT 13: The rule of law is what this country is founded on.

Captain America CAPTAIN AMERICA: No … it was founded on breaking the law. Because the law was wrong.

AGENT 13: That’s semantics, Steve. You know what I mean.

CAPTAIN AMERICA: It’s not semantics, Sharon. It’s the heart of this issue. The Registration Act is another step toward government control. And, while I love my country, I don’t trust many politicians. Not when they’re having their strings pulled by corporate donors. And not when they’re willing to trade freedom for security.

AGENT 13: Now you’re going to quote Ben Franklin at me? Give me a break.

CAPTAIN AMERICA: How about Thomas Paine? “Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must undergo the fatigue of supporting it.” …

AGENT 13: The Registration Act is law. If Captain America doesn’t follow the law, then who does?

CAPTAIN AMERICA: That’s why I can’t.

 


Dagny on a Train

Angelina Jolie [cross-posted at Liberty & Power]

Looks like Angelina Jolie will indeed be starring in the film version of Atlas Shrugged. (Conical hat tip to Wally Conger and Bob Bidinotto.)

This will likely translate into lots of new Rand readers, which is good. But as I’ve said before, we left-Randians will need to work hard to make sure new inquirers know about the full range of Rand’s legacy. I have some thoughts about how to do that – coming soon!


The Shroud of Turin

Dragonslayer's helmet Of all the various tales of Middle-Earth that J. R. R. Tolkien wrote in addition to The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, my favourite has long been his unfinished novel Narn i hin Húrin (“The Children of Hurin”), printed in Unfinished Tales.

There are two stories from the Middle-Earth backstory cycle that Tolkien wrote in various versions, both prose and verse, over and over and over again: the story of Beren and Luthien, and the story of Turin and the Dragon – the latter a grim tale of a doomed hero, drawing heavily on Norse and Finnish legends. (Picture an Elric story, but written by Tolkien.) Narn i hin Húrin is one of the many versions of the Turin story; but it is unique among the various Silmarillion-related works in being written in something much closer to novelistic style and detail than any other Middle-Earth material besides The Hobbit and LOTR. It really would have been another Middle-Earth novel if Tolkien had finished it. (One might say that if The Hobbit is Tolkien’s Rheingold and LOTR is Tolkien’s Götterdämmerung, then Narn i hin Húrin is Tolkien’s Siegfried and Walküre.)

Now comes the news (see here and here) that Christopher Tolkien, J. R. R.’s son, is completing the novel. Peter Jackson, are you listening?


The Rule of Names

Ursula K. Le Guin The documentary film Anarchism in America, which features interviews with Karl Hess and Murray Bookchin among others, is advertised as containing footage of sf author Ursula Le Guin as well. But a number of viewers have reported, with disappointment, that Le Guin is nowhere to be found.

I’m not so sure. In track 3, titled “International Symposium on Anarchism,” there’s a frustratingly brief clip of an unidentified woman saying: “I think anarchism to most people does mean bomb-throwing, at first. But they don’t know that it’s an idea at all, and a whole political philosophy, and a moral philosophy.”

Is that Le Guin? I think it might be. (Even if so, admittedly an insufficient basis for including her name in puffery for the film. Still, it’s an excellent film, worth a watch.)


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