Tag Archives | Molinari/C4SS

Other People Are Not Your Property, But This Button Can Be

ANARCHY button The slogan “Anarchy is the radical notion that other people are not your property” – which as far as I can tell I coined (see here, here, here for the core idea; the rest was borrowed from the more famous slogan “Feminism is the radical notion that women are people”) – is now available from the Molinari Institute not only as a trendy t-shirt but also as a bodacious button.

Although you can’t tell from the picture, the red letters are much brighter and more distinct on the button than on the t-shirt.

Or be doubly cool and wear the anarchy button on your anarchy t-shirt.

For any minarchists who are feeling left out, I see that there’s an outfit on CafePress that sells minarchist paraphernalia, complete with a new minarchy symbol. See? minarchists can look stylish too.

But if you wear one of our anarchist buttons on one of their minarchist t-shirts, you will promptly explode. A is A, man. A isn’t M.


Mitigate the Mythologisers! Execrate the Exploiters!

[cross-posted at Liberty & Power]

This is no time to go all Wobbly, George Wish you’d been a fly on the wall at last month’s Molinari Society symposium on “Anarchist Perspectives”?

Well, of course you don’t. A fly’s brain is too small to process the event properly. Plus you might have gotten squished against the wall by a stampeding bewilderment of philosophers.

But in any case, Charles Johnson’s comments on Matt MacKenzie’s and Geoff Plauché’s papers are now online. Gaudete igitur.


’Tis the Season for Anarchy in DC, Part 2

I’m back from Mordor! Though since most of the times I’ve been in DC have been libertarian-related (e.g., my three summers at IHS) I actually associate DC more with libertarianism than with statism. Well, that plus good ethnic restaurants, coffeeshops, and bookstores.

The Eye of Sauron watching over Mordor The Molinari Society meeting went well and had a good turnout (despite the meeting’s location being changed at the last minute). Matt MacKenzie argued that even mutually consensual transactions can be exploitative from a libertarian standpoint if they are enabled by unfairly coercive background conditions; Charles Johnson in his comments raised questions about unfair but noncoercive backgrounds, as well as some epistemological difficulties. Geoff Plauché criticised the founder-legislator myth from a Hayekian spontaneous-order standpoint; Charles in his comments raised questions about consciously constructed but noncoercive orders. Other libertarian-related events I attended included author-meets-critics sessions for Jan Narveson and Tara Smith, and the Objectivist Center reception. (Apparently for APA purposes they’re still calling themselves the Objectivist Center rather than the Atlas Society.) Good to see lots of old friends.

In the book exhibits I was pleased to see that the full, massive, unabridged version of Foucault’s History of Madness is finally available in English.

I also went to the Library of Congress to look up some old Molinari and Rose Wilder Lane stuff. When I first went to the Library back in 1987 (to photocopy the notoriously Nietzschean first edition of We the Living), security was so bad that I actually wrote my Congressman about it. (Yeah, I did stuff like that in those days.) Nowadays security is much tighter – but clearly aimed more at the threat of terrorists than at the more likely threat of thieves. It would now be fairly difficult to smuggle a bomb in – but still not terribly difficult to smuggle a book out.

While I was in DC two scoundrelly ex-presidents left this sphere – one hastily murdered, most likely to avoid embarrassing inquiries into the past dealings of the American state; the other obsequiously lauded, for similar reasons. The beat goes on ….


’Tis the Season for Anarchy in DC

[cross-posted at Liberty & Power]

To anyone planning to be at the APA in DC next week, don’t forget to check out the Molinari Society’s third annual Symposium:

Anarchy in DC GVIII-4. Friday, 29 December 2006, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m.
Molinari Society symposium: “Anarchist Perspectives”
Virginia Suite C (Lobby Level), Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, 2660 Woodley Road NW

Session 1, 11:15-12:15:
chair: Roderick T. Long (Auburn University)
speaker: Matthew MacKenzie (Muhlenberg College)
title: “Exploitation: A Dialectical Anarchist Perspective”
commentator: Charles W. Johnson (Molinari Institute)

Session 2, 12:15-1:15:
chair: Roderick T. Long (Auburn University)
speaker: Geoffrey Allan Plauché (Louisiana State University)
title: “On the Myth of the Founder-Legislator in Political Philosophy”
commentator: Charles W. Johnson (Molinari Institute)

Also, don’t miss the AAPSSfest on Jan Narveson (Thursday at 9) or the ARSfest on Tara Smith (Friday at 1:30). (But do miss Narveson’s other session, since, alas, it conflicts with the Molinarifest.) 

In other Molinari news, look for the first issue of The Industrial Radical some time next month.


Isabel Paterson, Genetic Superwoman?

[cross-posted at Liberty & Power]

Wonder Woman Florence Finch Kelly was an important libertarian writer of the late 19th century, and a contributor to Benjamin Tucker’s Liberty. Isabel Paterson was one of the leading libertarian theorists of the early-to-mid-20th century, and a major influence on Ayn Rand.

It now turns out that their trajectories intersected: Kelly wrote a review of Paterson’s first (or first published, anyway) novel, The Shadow Riders. It’s now online in the Molinari Institute’s online library.

I plan to put the novel online as well, but you’ll just have to wait ….


Molinari Event Tomorrow

C. L. R. James Tomorrow night Matthew Quest of the Onyx Foundation will be speaking at Auburn on the topic “Pan-African historian C.L.R. James’ views on Democracy in Ancient Greece.” I’ll be commenting. The event is being sponsored by the Auburn University Libertarians, the Onyx Foundation, and the Molinari Institute.

For anyone planning to be in the area, it’ll be in Foy Union 217 at 7:00 p.m., Thursday, November 30. Here are the background readings.

Incidentally, the Onyx Foundation in general, and Matthew’s work in particular, represent precisely the sort of potential intersection of “left ” and “libertarian” concerns that I’m forever blathering about, while the focus on classical Greece adds the Austro-Athenian dimension as well. (For Quest’s work on James see here.)


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