Archive | June 2, 2020

The March of Time

I realise that I’ve never blogged here, even minimally, about my trips from last March. (I thought I had, but actually I just discussed them on facebook.)

So on March 9-10 I participated in a workshop on exploitation, run by Matt Zwolinski and Ben Ferguson, at the University of San Diego.

I flew out a couple of days early in order to spend some time hanging out with my friends Gary Chartier and Alicia Homer.

Then on March 12-14 I attended the PPE conference in New Orleans. (That’s “Philosophy, Politics, and Economics,” not “Personal Protective Equipment.”) I gave a talk on “Virtue’s Unity and the Liberal Quest for Principled Moderation.” Several of my co-panelists, alas, had to pull out in light of the impending Coronapocalypse.

After that, the Coronapocalypse fell utterly across the land and all further travel was curtailed; thus I did not attend APEE (Las Vegas), the Pacific APA (San Francisco), or Gary and Alicia’s wedding celebration (Laguna Beach) in April, nor again the AtInER Philosophy Conference (Athens) in May.


Name Game

So here’s a puzzle.

When I was a little kid I often went by “Rod.”

But from at least 5th grade on I went by “Roderick,” as was my preference, and everyone called me “Roderick” (except my mother, who was the only person who still often called me “Rod,” and indeed did so ever after).

In high school I was Roderick. In college I was Roderick. In grad school I was Roderick.

Then, in the 90s, when I got my first teaching job at Chapel Hill, nearly everyone suddenly started calling me “Rod.” (I recall several people at Chapel Hill asking me if I preferred “Rod” or “Roderick”; I told them “Roderick,” but to no avail, as they usually gravitated unhesitatingly back to “Rod” again soon thereafter.)

And it wasn’t just a Chapel Hill thing, because people that I met in the libertarian academic sphere during that period – the Institute for Humane Studies, the Social Philosophy and Policy Center, etc. – also generally called me “Rod.” So it’s hard to identify a unified cause.

And to this day, people who first met me during that period of 1990-1997 (except for those who know me well enough to know better) usually call me “Rod.”

But then I moved to Auburn in 1998, and from then on people have almost always called me “Roderick” again – and not just people I met at or through Auburn either, so again a unified cause is elusive.


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